Head and Neck Cancer Research

About Head and Neck Cancer Research

Head and Neck Cancer Research

Head and Neck Cancer Research provides an opportunity to researchers and scientist to explore the advanced and latest research developments in the field of head and neck cancer and related academic disciplines.

The journal is focused on publishing articles on various areas of cancer like otolaryngology, throat cancer, thyroid cancer, tongue cancer, tonsil cancer, mouth cancer, lip cancer, nasal cavity cancer, soft palate cancer, paranasal sinus cancer, parathyroid cancer, salivary gland cancer, endocrine & many more and recent research in these areas. The Journal provides an open access platform to publish latest advancements in all aspects related to head and neck cancer.

Head and Neck Cancer Research is a multidisciplinary journal which publishes high quality original research studies, case studies, clinical trials, case reports, editorials, hypothesis, methodology, short reports, study protocols, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and management of patients with neoplasms in the head and neck and reviews.

Welcome to the Journal Portal! This is a resource for physicians to discover the latest findings in the area of head and neck cancer research through scientific abstracts.

We request authors to submit their manuscripts via e-mail to headandneck@oncologyjournals.org or through Editorial Manager System https://www.editorialmanager.com/imedpub/

Otolaryngology

Otorhinolaryngology (Otolaryngology) is the area of medicine that deals with disorders and conditions of the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) region, and related areas of the head and neck. Doctors who specialize in this area are called otorhinolaryngologists, otolaryngologists, ENT doctors, ENT surgeons, or head and neck surgeons. Patients seek treatment from an otorhinolaryngologist for diseases of the ear, nose, or throat and for the management of cancers of the head and neck.

Related journals of Otolaryngology
Clinical Otolaryngology, JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Clinical Otolaryngology, Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Esthesioneuroblastoma

Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB), also known as olfactory neuroblastoma, is a rare neoplasm originating from olfactory neuroepithelium. Due to the rare and complex nature of ENB, multiple opinions exist regarding the etiology, optimal staging system, and treatment modalities. These tumors often display varying biologic activity ranging from indolent growth, with patient survival exceeding 20 years, to a highly aggressive neoplasm capable of rapid widespread metastasis, with survival limited to a few months.

Related journals of Esthesioneuroblastoma
Journal of Neuroscience, Nature Neuroscience, Journal of Neuroscience Research, Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Neurobiology of Disease

Floor of mouth cancer

The floor of the mouth is a horseshoe-shaped area under the tongue, between the lower jaw bones (the mandible). When a malignant tumor grows in this area it is called floor of the mouth cancer. Most people have heard of cancer affecting parts of the body such as the lungs or breasts. However, cancer can appear in the mouth, where the disease can affect the lips, tongue, cheeks and throat. Anyone can be affected by mouth cancer, whether they have their own teeth or not. Mouth cancers are more common in people over 40, particularly men.

Related journals of Floor of mouth cancer
Japanese Journal of Head and Neck Cancer, Oral Oncology, Journal of Oral Hygiene & Health, Oral cancer

Lip cancer

Lip cancers are growths of abnormal cells that develop on the lips. They are the most common type of oral cancers. These are cancers that develop in thin, flat cells—called squamous cells—that line the mouth, tongue, cheeks, sinuses, lips, throat, and hard and soft palates. Lip cancers and other kinds of oral cancers are types of head and neck cancers. Certain lifestyle choices, such as smoking, drinking, and tanning, increase your risk of developing lip cancers. Dentists are the first line of defense against lip cancers, as they are typically the first to notice signs of lip cancers, often during a routine dental exam.

Related journals of Lip cancer
Japanese Journal of Head and Neck Cancer, Oral Oncology, Journal of Oral Hygiene & Health, Oral cancer

Mouth cancer

Mouth cancer, also known as oral cancer, is where a tumor develops on the surface of the tongue, mouth, lips or gums. Tumors can also occur in the salivary glands, tonsils and the pharynx (the part of the throat from your mouth to your windpipe) but these are less common. Anyone can be affected by mouth cancer, whether they have their own teeth or not. Mouth cancers are more common in people over 40. Most cases of mouth cancer are linked to tobacco and alcohol. Cigarette, cigar and pipe smoking are the main forms of tobacco. However, the traditional ethnic habits of chewing tobacco, betel quid, gutkha and paan are particularly dangerous.

Related journals of Mouth cancer
Oral Oncology, Journal of Oral Hygiene & Health, Oral cancer, JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Nasal cavity cancer

Nasal cavity or Paranasal sinus cancer may experience the following symptoms or signs. Sometimes, people with nasal cavity or paranasal sinus cancer do not show any of these symptoms. In fact, these types of cancer are usually diagnosed in their later stages because early stage cancer typically does not cause any symptoms. Cancer begins when normal cells in the body change and grows uncontrollably, forming a mass called a tumor. A tumor can be cancerous or benign. A cancerous tumor is malignant, meaning it can spread to other parts of the body. A benign tumor means the tumor will not spread and usually can be removed without growing back.

Related journals of Nasal cavity cancer
JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Clinical Otolaryngology, Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Nasopharyngeal cancer

Nasopharyngeal cancer is a rare type of head and neck cancer. It starts in the upper part of your throat, behind the nose. This area is called the nasopharynx. The nasopharynx is precariously placed at the base of your skull, above the roof of your mouth. Your nostrils open into the nasopharynx. When you breathe, air flows through your nose into your throat and nasopharynx, and eventually into your lungs. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a rare tumor arising from the epithelium of the nasopharynx. It accounts for approximately 1% of all childhood malignancies. Whereas almost all adult nasopharyngeal cancers are carcinomas, only 35-50% of nasopharyngeal malignancies are carcinomas in children. In the pediatric population, additional nasopharyngeal malignancies include rhabdomyosarcomas or lymphomas.

Related journals of Nasopharyngeal cancer
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Journal of NasoPharyngeal Carcinoma, British Journal of Cancer

Paranasal sinus cancer

Paranasal sinus and nasal cavity cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Different types of cells in the paranasal sinus and nasal cavity may become malignant. Being exposed to certain chemicals or dust in the workplace can increase the risk of paranasal sinus and nasal cavity cancer. Signs of paranasal sinus and nasal cavity cancer include sinus problems and nosebleeds.

Related journals of Paranasal sinus cancer
JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Journal of NasoPharyngeal Carcinoma

Parathyroid cancer

Parathyroid cancer is a cancerous (malignant) growth in a parathyroid gland. The parathyroid glands control the calcium level in the body. There are four parathyroid glands, two on top of each lobe of the thyroid gland, which is located at the base of the neck. Parathyroid cancer is a very rare type of cancer. Men and women are equally affected. It usually occurs in people older than 30. The cause of parathyroid cancer is unknown. People with a genetic condition called multiple endocrine neoplasia type I have an increased risk of this disease. People who had head or neck radiation may also be at increased risk. Such radiation exposure, however, is more likely to cause thyroid cancer.

Related journals of Parathyroid cancer
Annals of Oncology, Journal of Thyroid Research, Journal of Thyroid Cancer, Journal of Thyroid Disorders & Therapy

Salivary gland cancer

Salivary gland cancer is a type of head and neck cancer that involves abnormal (malignant) growth of salivary gland cells. Factors that increase the risk of salivary gland cancer include older age, radiation therapy to the head and neck, or exposure to cancer-causing chemicals at work. Symptoms and signs of salivary gland cancer include painless lump(s) in the area of the ear, cheek, jaw, lips, or mouth and/or fluid draining from the ear, trouble swallowing, difficulty opening the mouth, numbness or weakness to the face, and/or facial pain.

Related journals of Salivary gland cancer
Annals of Oncology, Journal of Thyroid Research, Journal of Thyroid Cancer, Journal of Thyroid Disorders & Therapy

Soft palate cancer

The palate is commonly called the roof of the mouth. It is divided into two parts: the bony hard palate in the front, and the fleshy soft palate (called the velum) in the back of the mouth. The hard palate is part of the oral cavity and the soft palate is part of the oropharynx. The hard palate creates a barrier between the mouth and the nasal cavity. A natural opening in the palate for nerves and blood vessels (near the third molar) can create a passageway for a tumor to spread into the nasal cavity. The soft palate closes the nasal passage during swallowing so food does not enter the nose. It also helps create speech sounds. If the palate does not function correctly during speech, air escapes through the nose, and the speech has a nasal sound. During a sneeze, the soft palate closes the nasal passage to protect it. Substances in the sneeze are thrown out into mouth.

Related journals of Soft palate cancer
Oral Oncology, Journal of Oral Hygiene & Health, Oral cancer, JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Throat cancer

Signs of throat cancer may be difficult to identify in the early stages of the disease. Many symptoms associated with throat cancer are the same as a cold or sore throat. Common throat cancer symptoms may include. Difficulty swallowing, also known as dysphagia, Changes in your voice, Sore throat, Unexplainable weight loss, Swelling of the eyes, jaw, throat or neck, Bleeding in the mouth or through the nose, Chronic cough. Some symptoms of throat cancer are specific to certain areas of the body. For instance, changes in your voice may be a sign of laryngeal (voice box) cancer, but would rarely indicate cancer of the pharynx.

Related journals of Throat cancer
Clinical Otolaryngology, JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Clinical Otolaryngology, Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Thyroid cancer

An individual suspects he/she may have thyroid cancer, he/she should consult an oncologist and/or an endocrinologist (a doctor who specializes in the treatment of endocrine disorders). Gland swelling commonly refers to enlargement of the lymph glands, also known as lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are small rounded or bean-shaped masses of lymphatic tissue surrounded by a capsule of connective tissue. Lymph glands (nodes) are located in many places in the lymphatic system throughout the body. Lymph nodes filter the lymphatic fluid and store special cells that can trap cancer cells or bacteria that are traveling through the body in the lymph fluid. The lymph nodes are critical for the body's immune response and are principal sites where many immune reactions are initiated.

Related journals of Thyroid cancer
Annals of Oncology, Journal of Thyroid Research, Journal of Thyroid Cancer, Journal of Thyroid Disorders & Therapy

Tongue cancer

Tongue, the oral tongue and the base of the tongue. Cancer can develop in either part. The oral tongue is the part you see when you poke your tongue out at someone. This is the front two thirds of your tongue. Cancers that develop in this part of the tongue come under a group of cancers called mouth (oral) cancer. Tongue cancer is a form of cancer that begins in the cells of the tongue. Several types of cancer can affect the tongue, but tongue cancer most often begins in the thin, flat squamous cells that line the surface of the tongue. The type of cells involved in your tongue cancer helps determine your prognosis and treatment.

Related journals of Tongue cancer
Oral Oncology, Journal of Oral Hygiene & Health, Oral cancer, JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Tonsil cancer

Tonsil cancer is cancer that occurs in one of the three types of tonsils of the throat. It most commonly occurs in the palatine tonsils, which are located on either side of the throat, although it can also occur in the pharyngeal tonsils (also called adenoids), which are behind the nasal cavity, or in the lingual tonsils, which are at the back of the tongue. Most tonsil cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, which arise in the lining tissues of the mouth, although it is possible for lymphoma (a type of immune system cancer) to develop in the tonsils. Smoking is the most common risk factor for squamous cell carcinomas of the tonsils. Alcohol is also a risk factor; the combination of smoking and alcohol use yields an even greater risk than using either substance alone.

Related journals of Tonsil cancer
Oral Oncology, Journal of Oral Hygiene & Health, Oral cancer, JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Sinuses

The sinuses are a connected system of hollow cavities in the skull. The largest sinus cavities are around an inch across; others are much smaller. The sinuses are lined with soft, pink tissue called mucosa. Normally, the sinuses are empty except for a thin layer of mucus. The inside of the nose has ridges called turbinates. Normally these structures help humidify and filter air. The nose is divided in the center by a thin wall, called the septum. Most of the sinuses drain into the nose through a small channel or drainage pathway called the middle meatus. The purpose of the sinuses is unclear. One theory is that sinuses help humidify the air we breathe in; another is that they enhance our voices.

Related journals of Sinuses
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Journal of NasoPharyngeal Carcinoma, British Journal of Cancer

Pharynx (throat)

Pharyngitis is inflammation of the pharynx, which is in the back of the throat. It’s most often referred to simply as “sore throat.” Pharyngitis can also cause scratchiness in the throat and difficulty swallowing. More cases of pharyngitis occur during the colder months of the year. It’s also one of the most common reasons why people stay home from work. In order to properly treat a sore throat, it’s important to identify its cause. Pharyngitis may be caused by bacterial or viral infections.

Related journals of Pharynx
Clinical Otolaryngology, JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Clinical Otolaryngology, Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Larynx (voice box)

Laryngeal cancer is not as well known by the general public as some other types of cancer, yet it is not a rare disease. Even for survivors, the consequences of laryngeal cancer can be severe with respect to voice, breathing, or swallowing. It is fundamentally a preventable disease though, since the primary risk factors for laryngeal cancer are associated with modifiable behaviors.

Related journals of Larynx
Annals of Oncology, Journal of Thyroid Research, Journal of Thyroid Cancer, Journal of Thyroid Disorders & Therapy

Upper esophagus

Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) has also been referred to as the inferior pharyngeal sphincter because it is located at the lower end of pharynx and guards the entrance into the esophagus. It has two major functions: (1) to prevent air from entering into the esophagus during breathing and (2) to prevent reflux of esophageal contents into the pharynx to guard airway aspiration. The upper esophageal sphincter (UES) is a bundle of muscles at the top of the esophagus. The muscles of the UES are under conscious control, used when breathing, eating, belching, and vomiting. They keep food and secretions from going down the windpipe.

Related journals of Upper esophagus
Oral Oncology, Journal of Oral Hygiene & Health, Oral cancer, JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Endocrine

The endocrine system, it influences almost every cell, organ, and function of our bodies. The endocrine system plays a role in regulating mood, growth and development, tissue function, metabolism, and sexual function and reproductive processes. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include Growth and development, Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature, Sexual function, Reproduction, Mood.

Related journals of Endocrine
Journal of Endocrinology & Metabolic Syndrome, Clinical Pediatric Endocrinology, Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes, International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology, Endocrinology Studies

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